magnezone:

rainbow road isn’t hard it’s you that is weak and natural selection has its sights locked 

We're running out of colors...

kateordie:

allnewmsmarvel:

A few weeks ago, we announced that Ms. Marvel #1 is getting its SIXTH PRINTING. Wowza. If you aren’t already aware, that’s pretty historic. Simultaneously, issue 2 is getting a 4th printing and issues 4 and 5 are getting their 2nd printing. We’re elated, not only because it…

I keep telling you guys to read this and I MEAN it!

4 weeks ago · 568 notes · Reblog
#ms marvel #Marvel Comics 
high resolution →

(Source: meme4u)

4 weeks ago · 52,765 notes · Reblog
depressioncomix:

196
high resolution →

depressioncomix:

196

1 month ago · 1,673 notes · Reblog
#depression #mental health 
scorchedearthprotocols:

how does this have so many notes and not an artist credit?Nation of Amanda 
Geez, people.

scorchedearthprotocols:

how does this have so many notes and not an artist credit?

Nation of Amanda 

Geez, people.

(Source: thisparadiseishell)

For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

1 month ago · 13,385 notes · Reblog
#oh snaaaaap #literature 
2,070,209 plays

lostinhistory:

geekgirlsmash:

hypotheticalyiff:

peetamellarkeys:

birdthenerd:

I have never reblogged something so fast in my life

it’s exactly what you think it is

This is exactly how I feel when my tall friends wear high heels. 

*chair dances*

1 month ago · 294,282 notes · Reblog

So Dude You Think She Friend Zoned You?

thepeacockangel:

Are you sure you aren’t actually in any of the following zones?

  • The enemy zone
  • The Twilight Zone
  • The Romulan Neutral Zone
  • THE ZONE!!!!!! (as yelled by a personal trainer)
  • The ritual sacrifice zone
  • The patsy for my big heist zone
  • The Sky Zone indoor trampoline center
  • The “generally to be avoided” zone
  • The Fun Zone play maze and laser tag venue
  • The end zone
  • The “actually my brother but must never know because of our father’s dark secret” zone
  • Any of the earth’s many temperate zones
  • The Danger Zone as performed by Kenny Loggins

Think carefully now.  Are you really sure?  

1 month ago · 601 notes · Reblog
teland:

gailsimone:

badguyshavetheworstaim:

a comic done by christianne benedict, posted on the womanthology art forum. brilliant!

YES. Jesus, thank you.
I cannot tell you how many times I have had to point out what the audience at conventions actually LOOKS like to people in the industry. They can do signings in a booth full of every kind of person all day long, every color, every size, every orientation and more, and STILL go online and talk about how only white straight males read comics.
IT IS PROFOUNDLY UNTRUE AND INSULTINGLY IGNORANT.

"The Women Men Don’t See" — James Tiptree, Jr. (AKA Rebecca Sheldon — thanks, buggeryisthegenus)
And really — the *everyone* men don’t see, when you get right down to it. They don’t see us, they’re convinced we don’t spend money — not on the merch they want to make, anyway — and, if we make so much noise that they have to acknowledge us anyway?
Well, we’re not “real” fans.
*rolls eyes so hard they get stuck*
high resolution →

teland:

gailsimone:

badguyshavetheworstaim:

a comic done by christianne benedict, posted on the womanthology art forum. brilliant!

YES. Jesus, thank you.

I cannot tell you how many times I have had to point out what the audience at conventions actually LOOKS like to people in the industry. They can do signings in a booth full of every kind of person all day long, every color, every size, every orientation and more, and STILL go online and talk about how only white straight males read comics.

IT IS PROFOUNDLY UNTRUE AND INSULTINGLY IGNORANT.

"The Women Men Don’t See" — James Tiptree, Jr. (AKA Rebecca Sheldon — thanks, buggeryisthegenus)

And really — the *everyone* men don’t see, when you get right down to it. They don’t see us, they’re convinced we don’t spend money — not on the merch they want to make, anyway — and, if we make so much noise that they have to acknowledge us anyway?

Well, we’re not “real” fans.

*rolls eyes so hard they get stuck*

(Source: lizlem0nparty)

1 month ago · 20,016 notes · Reblog

coolschmoolzines:

Hawkeye #19 was well worth the wait. I thought nothing would ever top Pizza Dog.

#19 is mostly in sign language with very little subtitles showing just how awesome the medium of comics can be.

thebeldamsbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK
We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

Did you guess yet?

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.
Have you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”
Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

This isn’t even being qeued. This is just being reblogged, because some of you still don’t understand who directed Coraline.
high resolution →

thebeldamsbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK

We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

image

Did you guess yet?

image

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

image

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

image

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.

imageHave you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

image

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”

Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

This isn’t even being qeued. This is just being reblogged, because some of you still don’t understand who directed Coraline.

1 month ago · 59,947 notes · Reblog

Friendship isn’t about who you’ve known the longest. It’s about who walked into your life, said “I’m here for you” and proved it.

(via chalriepace)

(Source: ispeakquotes.com)

1 month ago · 95,940 notes · Reblog

kateordie:

Hands up if you’ve had almost this exact conversation!

🙋

(Source: huffingtonpost)

1 month ago · 145,376 notes · Reblog
#lgbtq #sexuality 

surprisebitch:

this show seriously tackles all issues

(Source: kimagreggs)

1 month ago · 281,421 notes · Reblog
#orange is the new black #oitnb 

buttspectre:

why would you want to be an offensive stereotype for Halloween

when u can be

this

image

(Source: pinkhairedgoddess)

1 month ago · 264,869 notes · Reblog